Twesigye Jackson Kaguri talks about The Price of Stones

September 19, 2010 at 10:13 PM Leave a comment


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By the early 1990s, some 2.2 million children in Uganda had lost one or both parents to AIDS. The epidemic touched the lives of many Ugandans, including Twesegye* Jackson Kaguri, who lost his brother Frank and sister Mbabazi to the disease.

In these Skype-recorded episodes of Bookpod, Jackson Kaguri talks about The Price of Stones, the book he wrote to publicize the role that education – especially the Nyaka AIDS Orphans School – is playing in stemming the incidence of the disease.

It takes a village to raise children. What role can education play in improving the lives of girls who have been made orphans by HIV/AIDS? (This segment is the feature episode on Bookpod.) READ THE TRANSCRIPT

The boys at Nyaka AIDS School. What role can education play in improving the lives of boys who have been made orphans by HIV/AIDS? READ THE TRANSCRIPT

The grandmothers’ program at Nyaka. When young Ugandan mothers and fathers die from AIDS, grandparents often become parents again. READ THE TRANSCRIPT

How did he become Twesigye Jackson Kaguri? The author talks about the depth of his Christian faith and how it led to the founding of the Nyaka AIDS Orphans School. READ THE TRANSCRIPT

DONATE to the Nyaka AIDS Orphans Project

* Twesegye is pronounced TWE-see-jay.

Back to www.bookpod.org

Related link:

BetterWorldBooks blog

Entry filed under: Africa, AIDS, audio essays, Bookpod, Education, Family, God, Healthcare, Non-fiction. Tags: , , , , , , .

Sylvie, the battered rebbetzin Hold the advice. They’re not listening!

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